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How long is potassium sulfate fertilizer effective? The correct use of potassium sulfate fertilizer.

How long is potassium sulfate fertilizer effective? The correct use of potassium sulfate fertilizer.

Issue Time:2021-06-07
Potassium sulfate is a chemically neutral, physical acid fertilizer, which is widely used in various soils and various crops, especially for chlorides. Potassium sulfate replaces potassium chloride and becomes a good potash fertilizer. So, how long is potassium sulfate fertilizer effective? Do you know the correct use of potassium sulfate fertilizer?

How long is potassium sulfate fertilizer effective
Ordinary potassium sulfate fertilizer has a short fertilizer effect period. From the perspective of potassium sulfate fertilizer as a base fertilizer, it generally has a fertilizer effect period of one or two months. If it is a potassium sulfate slow-release fertilizer, the fertilizer effect period is long, which can ensure the nutrient requirements of the crop throughout the growth period.

If too much fertilizer is applied, the time that the fertilizer can stay in the field will vary depending on the type of fertilizer. Do not apply two topdressing at one time.

The correct use of potassium sulfate fertilizer
1. It can be used as base fertilizer. When potassium sulfate is used as a base fertilizer in dry fields, the soil must be applied deeply to reduce the fixation of potassium crystals, facilitate the absorption of crop roots, and increase the utilization rate.

2. Used as top dressing. Since potassium has a relatively small mobility in the soil, it should be applied in concentrated strips or holes to soil layers with dense roots to promote absorption.

3. It can be used as seed fertilizer and extra-root topdressing. The dosage of seed fertilizer is 1.5 to 2.5 kg per mu, and it can also be formulated into a solution of 2% to 3% for extra-root topdressing.

Precautions for using potassium sulfate:
(1) Potassium sulfate is not as good as potassium chloride for soils with strong reducing properties such as paddy fields. The main disadvantage is that it is prone to produce hydrogen sulfide poisoning. Acidic soil should be combined with lime application.

(2) Potassium sulfate is more expensive. In general, except for crops that are sensitive to chlorine, potassium sulfate should not be used for those that can use potassium chloride.

(3) For cruciferous crops and garlic and other crops that require a lot of sulfur, the effect is better and should be used first.